Keiser Report: Privacy is a Rare Moon Bear ( E1386)

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max and Stacy discuss the ‘rare moon bear’ saved from extinction by the decades-old conflict and tensions between the two Koreas. They use this as an analogy for our privacy which has mostly become extinct, mostly thanks to our collective role in handing over our private data. Only the few who are not on social media may not yet have had their data incorporated into a snooping algorithm. In the second half, Max interviews cryptographer Harry Halpin about a Tor competitor he has designed, called Nym. They discuss ‘the dark web,’ privacy, and the problems with Tor.

RT’s Keiser Report discusses the report, using it as an analogy for our privacy. Stacy Herbert compares it with the human situation in a surveillance state, noting that there are still “some humans that live outside a CCTV camera, humans that don’t have a GPS monitor anywhere near them” because they might live somewhere in the middle of South or North Dakota. Max Keiser recalls his theory of the “economy’s insectualisation” where humans are becoming a colony of insects (bees or ants). That’s all enabled by the 5G surveillance state, he says.

https://www.rt.com/shows/keiser-report/459865-korea-tensions-private-data/

https://youtu.be/I2PnB7K7FpI

No to Christchurch Call: Put aside your hate of Trump for a day – he may have just saved free speech

What is certain is that any filtering, reporting and pre-moderation technologies developed as a result of the Christchurch Call will be adopted with enthusiasm by genuinely repressive regimes, and likely deployed by the California giants themselves at the request of such governments, who will cite their own anti-extremism legislation.

By abstaining from the document, the US now has a chance not only of protecting its own population, but of sabotaging the entire Christchurch Call project. All the companies involved are still operating primarily under US jurisdiction, so they will be shielded from these initiatives. Indeed, if they decide to impose these measures over the will of American citizens, they leave themselves open to First Amendment-based government regulation, and what may eventually become costly lawsuits.

So, there remains one opportunity here is to drop the partisan politics, and rally behind the White House decision for the sake of free speech – if you believe in it. By not making it a Donald Trump versus the World issue, there is a chance to help not only Americans, but the cause of freedom around the globe.

By Igor Ogorodnev

https://www.rt.com/news/459563-christchurch-call-trump-macron/

Cambridge Capitulates to the Mob and Fires a Young Scholar

We live at a time where academic freedom is under threat from ideologues and activists of all persuasions. The latest threat comes from St Edmund’s College, Cambridge, where administrators appear to have capitulated to a mob of activists (students and academics) who mounted a campaign to have a young scholar fired for “problematic” research. The back-story was covered by Quillette last December.

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The norms of academia—which have been built up and preserved by institutions such as Cambridge for centuries—demand that academics engage with each other in a scholarly manner. That is, if one academic has a problem with the methods or conclusions of another’s research, he or she should address those concerns within journals, according to established procedures, which other scholars can then read and respond to, including the academic whose research is being challenged.

Today, due to the hyper-specialisation of academic fields, most academics will not be able to judge the quality of scholarship that is published in journals outside their field. That’s why when research is peer-reviewed it is done by experts in the specific field in which the research was carried out, not by a random selection of university professors. Just as a professor of English will not be able to judge a study conducted within chemical engineering, a chemical engineer will not be able to assess a scholarly essay on Shakespeare’s sonnets.

To judge the quality of Dr Noah Carl’s work authoritatively, one would have to be an expert in at least one of the following fields: psychology, intelligence research (a sub-field of psychology), and/or economics. The campaign against him began with an ‘open letter’ that was signed by hundreds of academics, but they did not have expertise in these areas. (For the most part, they had qualifications in fields like anthropology, gender studies and critical race studies). This is a clear departure from the established norms that, until recently, were adhered to in academic debates, a point made in an editorial about this affair by the executive team at the Heterodox Academy:

Communal inquiry and debate are at the heart of the academy. As researchers, we put our ideas into the crucible of open inquiry and rely on debate and discussion to refine understanding and advance solutions to complex problems. The practice of issuing open letters attacking scholars for their contributions undermines this important goal by evicting academics and their ideas from the arena—often on flimsy evidentiary grounds. More constructive responses can and should be employed.

The administrators at St Edmund’s College who determined that Dr Noah Carl should be fired did not have qualifications in these areas, either. The Master of St. Edmunds is a former banker, and the administrator who led the investigation that decided Dr Carl is guilty of “poor scholarship” is a veterinary scientist.

Cambridge Capitulates to the Mob and Fires a Young Scholar